Posts Tagged ‘Termite removal’

Termite Awareness week is fast approaching!

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

Termite Awareness Week

Termite Control & Inspection Questions

Monday, June 10th, 2013

What do you do when you’ve found your dream home, but discover that it’s crawling with termites?

The truth is, there are two kinds of homes: those that have had termites and those that will get them.  And, while they cause $5 billion in damage each year, there is no reason to run away from the purchase.  A pest control professional can correct the problem so that you can live comfortably in your dream home.

How difficult are termites to treat?

Termites are nearly impossible for homeowners to treat on their own.  On the other hand, pest control professionals have the training, expertise, equipment, and technology to eliminate termite infestations.

How much does a termite treatment cost?

They can range anywhere from $800 to $1,800 dollars, depending on where you live, the construction of your home, severity of the infestation, and the type of contract offered by your pest control professional.  Your pest control professional will give you a free estimate.

What are the different types of termite treatments?

There are two primary types of treatments available for use by the professional: liquids and baits.  Liquids are used around a home area to ensure long-term protection or used to treat wood directly. Baits systems involve placing monitoring stations in the ground.

Are these products dangerous to kids and pets?

All professional pest control products have been registered for use by the EPA.

When they are applied according to label instructions by technicians who have been trained and licensed to use them, they pose little risk. Also, the products are applied in areas not frequented by people (under soil surface, in walls, in stations under the soil).

What is the most effective type of termite treatment?

A trained and licensed pest control operator is the best person to make a recommendation for each particular property. Also, homeowners might have a preference as to which technology to use so it is important that they have a detailed conversation with their pest control company.

Why should someone hire a professional instead of attempting to control their pest problems by themselves?

Just as you wouldn’t prescribe medicine for yourself or drill your own cavities – you shouldn’t attempt to control termites – or other pests — on your own. The products and the expertise offered by professional pest control far surpasses what a homeowner could do on their own.  Leave it up to the experts for peace of mind. Why risk it?

What questions should homeowners ask during a professional termite inspection/treatment?

  • What type of treatment is recommended?
  • How long will the treatment take?
  • How much will it cost?
  • How long will it take to get rid of the termites?
  • What type of contract or guarantee is offered?
  • Are they a member of the National Pest Management Association?

How long does a termite treatment typically take?

Termite treatments typically will take no more than a day.

How long until the termites are gone?

That depends on the location, extent of damage, and the products used to treat the infestation.  After a thorough inspection, your professional pest control company should be able to tell you what they will use to get rid of the termites and how long it will take.

What can a homeowner do to prevent termites?

  • The most common types of termites love moisture, if you have any moisture around the foundation of your home, take steps to remove the moisture and eliminate the source.
  • Divert water away with properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.
  • Reduce humidity in crawl spaces with proper ventilation.
  • Prevent shrubs, vines and other vegetation from growing over and covering vents.
  • Be sure to remove old form boards, grade stakes, etc., left in place after the building was constructed. Remove old tree stumps and roots around and beneath the building.
  • Most importantly, eliminate any wood contact with the soil. An 18-inch gap between the soil and wood portions of the building is ideal.
  • It doesn’t hurt to routinely inspect the foundation of your home for signs of termite damage.

Can pests other than termites damage property?

Absolutely. Carpenter ants, carpenter bees and powder post beetles are all categorized as wood destroying insects.  That’s why it’s important to have a professional identify the source of your problem and provide the treatment to control it.

What should a homeowner look for when selecting a PCO?

  • A qualified and licensed pest management company that is a member of national, state or local pest management associations.
  • Ask friends and neighbors to recommend companies they have used successfully.
  • Buy value, not price.
  • Before signing a contract, be sure to fully understand the nature of the pest to be controlled, the extent of the infestation, and the work necessary to solve the problem.
  • Find out if the company has liability insurance to cover any damages to your house or furnishings during treatment.
  • If a guarantee is given, know what it covers, how long it lasts, what you must do to keep it in force, and what kind of continuing prevention and management are necessary. 

If you hire a pest control professional, are you guaranteed a pest-free home?

Pest control companies differ in their guarantees. Pests and pest conditions constantly change around a home, so pests can come back. If a guarantee is given, know what it covers, how long it lasts, what you must do to keep it in force, and what kind of continuing prevention and management are necessary.

It is important that homeowners remain active participants before, during and after all pest control treatments.   This type of vigilance helps the homeowner better understand their contract and possible guarantee, and helps the PCO understand the homeowner’s expectations.

Termite Season is Here: Is Your Property at Risk?

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

April 4, 2011 (Fairfax, VA) – As spring warms its way across the country, flowers are not the only signs of spring sprouting out of the ground. It’s also the time of year when termites come in search of a new habitat – such as winter weathered homes. As a result of excessive precipitation experienced across the country this past winter, many homes may have sustained damage to walls, ceilings and insulation, creating moisture that attracts termites.

Termites are known as “silent destroyers” because of their ability to chew through wood, flooring and even wallpaper undetected. Swarmers, looking to start a new colony, are typically the first sign of termite season as these winged-pests show up inside homes in early spring. It’s important that homeowners do not mistake swarmers for flying ants, as the two species look alike to an untrained eye. Discarded wings near windowsills and doors are often a sign that swarmers have already found their way in.

Because termites cause $5 billion in property damage every year, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) urges homeowners to take action. Termite damage is typically not covered by homeowners’ insurance and can quickly add up to a hefty expense to repair structural damage.

“Termites have an insatiable appetite for cellulose found in wood, eating 24-hours a day, seven days a week. They cause serious and costly damage and compromise the structural stability of a home,” advised Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “NPMA advises homeowners to have their homes inspected annually and especially if they’ve noticed swarmers.”

NPMA offers these additional tips:

  • Inspect perimeter of a home for rotting wood and mud tubes.
  • Avoid water accumulation near the home’s foundation.
  • Never bury wood scraps in the yard. If the home is newly built, remove any remaining grade stakes.
  • Keep mulch at least 12 inches from the foundation.
  • If you suspect an infestation, contact a licensed pest professional.

To learn more, visit www.pestworld.org

Why Some Termites Become Queens and Others Don’t

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

WASHINGTON  –  New research explains which specific chemicals are used by some termite queens to prevent other termites in the colony from becoming mommies like themselves.

NC State’s Dr. Ed Vargo and colleagues from Japan and Switzerland show that a combination of two chemical compounds in a pheromone perfume emitted by egg-laying females known as secondary queens can inhibit other termites from developing into new queens.

“With this long missing key ingredient now in hand, I expect we’ll see rapid progress in understanding how reproductive and non-reproductive termite castes develop,” said Vargo.

This ‘discrimination’ is required to maintain a balance – proper proportion of workers who forage for food and take care of larvae, soldiers who defend the colony, and secondary queens who lay eggs to increase a colony’s numbers.

The study is published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (ANI).

Source: http://www.pctonline.com/termite-research-queens.aspx

Termite Control