Posts Tagged ‘Memphis Ant control’

Avoid ants and stinging insects at your Labor Day cookout!

Friday, August 8th, 2014

Avoid ants and stinging insects at your Labor Day cookout! Follow these steps:

  1. Mosquitoes are most active at dusk and dawn, so if you are planning a barbeque before sunset, plan on having plenty of insect repellant containing an EPA-registered active ingredient like DEET or Picaridin available for you and your guests. Adorn your deck or patio with citronella candles that can help minimize the presence of mosquitoes in the area, and wear long sleeves or pants to avoid bites.
  2. Yellowjackets and other stinging insects are attracted to fragrances from shampoo, perfume and candles — not to mention food and drink. Avoid using scented items beforehand and provide clear plastic cups for your guests as aluminum cans and plastic bottles are good hiding spots for stinging insects.
  3. Prior to the party, check screen doors and repair any holes. And with guests coming in and out of your house, make sure the doors close behind them.
  4. Keep all food and beverages in sealed coolers and containers.
  5. Keep garbage containers sealed and away from guests.
  6. Clean trash, spills and crumbs immediately from tables and other surfaces.
  7. Bring utensils and dishware indoors shortly after the meal.
  8. Rinse all beverage bottles and cans, and dispose of them in tightly closed garbage containers.
  9. Plan to serve food and beverages indoors, and reserve outdoor space for eating and entertaining.
  10. Remove or drain sources of standing water in your yard that could be a breeding ground for mosquitoes, including birdbaths, wading pools or garden ponds.

Free in-home Pest Evaluation!

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Chikungunya Virus

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Chikungunya Virus

 – National Pest Management Association

Information on Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention

 

Chikungunya, a viral infection transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes, originated in southeast Africa and was first described in Tanzania in 1952. Subsequently, it has spread throughout sub-Saharan Africa and has become well established in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and islands of the Indian and Pacific Ocean.

More recently, Chikungunya has been reported in at least 15 Caribbean islands, including Hispaniola (Haiti & Santo Domingo), as well as French Guiana on mainland South America.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as of June 10, a total of 39 chikungunya cases have been reported from U.S. states and territories. One locally transmitted case has been reported from Puerto Rico. All other cases occurred in travelers returning from affected areas in the Caribbean or Asia. To date, no local transmission has been identified in the continental United States.

The mosquitos that carry the Chikungunya virus (aedes egypti and aedaes albopictus) can bite during the day and at night, both indoors and outdoors, and often live around buildings in urban areas.

Symptoms and Treatment

Typical symptoms of Chikungunya infection include the rapid onset of severe joint pains (especially in the hands and feet) and fever. In fact, the name “Chikungunya” derives from a word in the Kimakonde language of south east Africa, meaning “to become contorted” and describes the stooped appearance of sufferers with joint pain. Symptoms start four to eight days after the mosquito bite (range from two to 12 days). Infected persons can also have headache, muscle pain, rash and joint swelling. Generally, symptoms resolve after one week, although some people may experience long-term joint pain. Chikungunya is generally not fatal, but the painful symptoms have led people to say “It won’t kill you, but it may make you wish you were dead!”

Because there is no specific antiviral drug treatment for Chikungunya, physicians direct patients to use over the counter analgesics and medication to control fever, and to get plenty of rest and fluids.

Several methods can be used for diagnosis.  If you develop the symptoms of Chikungunya and have recently traveled, see your doctor. Your doctor may order blood tests to look for Chikungunya or other similar diseases.

Prevention

Since a vaccine to prevent Chikungunya does not exist, it is best to try and avoid infection in the first place.

As the Caribbean is a popular vacation spot for many Americans, avoiding travel may not be a realistic or desirable option. Rather, travelers are advised to take a number of precautions when staying in countries where Chikungunya is endemic.

Travelers should don protective clothing (long-sleeved shirts, long pants, hats) that is treated with insect repellent. When spending time outdoors, travelers should use insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535, on exposed skin.

When choosing a hotel, ensure the rooms are equipped with fully functioning air conditioning systems, as well as door and window screens. Insecticide-treated mosquito nets afford good protection, as do mosquito coils or other insecticide vaporizers to reduce contact with mosquitoes indoors, especially in high risk areas.

During outbreaks of Chikungunya – or if mosquito populations surge – community-wide insect/vector control programs may be activated and travelers should heed these warnings.

Finally, patients who are diagnosed with Chikungunya should avoid additional exposure to mosquitoes to help prevent the further spread of the virus to other mosquitoes and subsequently to other people.

Tips for Pest Prevention in Atlanta

Monday, June 16th, 2014
  • Seal cracks and holes along the foundation of the home including entry points for utilities and pipes.
  • Screen windows and doors.
  • Eliminate sources of moisture or standing water around the house, including birdbaths and in clogged gutters.
  • Keep tree branches and other plants cut back from the house.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet from the home on a raised structure such as concrete blocks or poles.
  • Inspect the outside of a home for nests built by stinging insects, which are typically found in the eaves under roofs.
  • Keep kitchens clean by wiping down counters and other food surfaces after meal prep.
  • Take out the trash frequently and store it in a sealed receptacle outdoors.
  • Avoid leaving pets’ food dishes out for long periods of time.

Ant groups ‘more efficient than Google’ in processing data, new study finds

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

While individual ‘scout’ ants may seem chaotic in their movements, they are leaving a pheromone trails to allow other ants to follow them to food sources

The dedication and stamina of the worker ant, toiling through the summer months and preparing for winter, were celebrated in Aesop’s Fables – in contrast to the lazy, singing grasshopper, unready for the hardships ahead.

Now research shows that ants don’t just flourish because they work hard and will slavishly sacrifice themselves for the collective. Their success is also due to their group ability to process information “far more efficiently than Google” in the daily search for food, according to scientists.

A major behavioural mathematics study, which could also have ramifications for how we understand human behaviour on the internet, used complex computer modelling to reveal how ants bring order to chaos by creating “highly complex networks” to govern their actions.

It found that not only are ants “surprisingly efficient”, but they are able to deploy ingenious navigation strategies to divide themselves between “scout” and “gathering” ants during “complex feed-search movements”.

The joint Chinese-German study, which is published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that while individual “scout” ants may seem “chaotic” in their movements, they are leaving a trail of pheromones to allow following “gathering” ants to refine and shorten their journeys to food sources in the vicinity of the colony.

As this journey is repeated again and again by worker ants carrying their loads, a “self-reinforcing effect of efficiency” creates a shorter trail, saving the colony the time and energy of “continued chaotic foraging”. “While single ants can appear chaotic and random-like, they very quickly become an ordered line of ants crossing the woodland floor in the search for food,” co-author of the study Professor Jurgen Kurths told The Independent.

He added: “That transition between chaos and order is an important mechanism and I’d go so far as to say that the learning strategy involved in that, is more accurate and complex than a Google search. These insects are, without doubt, more efficient than Google in processing information about their surroundings.”

Previous studies had shown that worker ants assigned the most dangerous food-gathering tasks tended to be older, less valuable insects. This suggested that ant colonies were reluctant to risk their younger, more productive members.

However, the new study reveals that older ants are valued for their increased knowledge of their nest’s surroundings.

According to Professor Kurths, the mathematical model used in the study – which converted well-known ant behaviour patterns into equations and algorithms – is equally applicable to other animals that share homing instincts, such as albatrosses.

It could even be used to provide a “new perspective” on behavioural patterns  of humans in areas as diverse as transportation systems and  how we browse the internet.

The study comes a week after a team from the Georgia Institute of Technology revealed that ants’ skills at building stable tunnels in loose sand could aid in the design of a new generation of search-and-rescue robots.

The team used high-speed cameras to observe how fire ants can use their antennae as extra limbs to catch themselves when they fall, in a development that can be reproduced in the development of fledgling rescue technologies.

May News from Bug Busters USA

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

May News from Bug Busters USA

TOUCH A TRUCK1

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Ant Control Tips from Bug Busters USA

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

Experts from Bug Busters USA recommend the following five simple steps that homeowners can do today to thwart an ant infestation.

1.       Block off access points. Take time to inspect the outside of your home for cracks and crevices, paying special attention to areas where utility pipes enter. Seal any small holes or gaps with a silicone-based caulk. Keep tree branches and other shrubbery well trimmed and away from the structure.
2.       Eliminate sources of water in and around the home. Indoors, routinely check under sinks for areas of moisture and repair any leaky pipes. Consider using a dehumidifier in damp basements, crawl spaces or attics. Outside, ensure that downspouts and gutters are functioning properly so that water flows away from the home’s foundation.
3.       Keep a clean kitchen. Wipe down counter tops and sweep floors to remove crumbs and residue from spills. Store food in sealed containers, and keep ripe fruit in the refrigerator. Also, make sure to dispose of garbage regularly.
4.       Don’t forget about the pets. After mealtime, keep pet bowls clean and wipe up any spilled food or water around them promptly. Store dry pet food in a sealed plastic container rather than the paper bags they often come in, which can be easily accessed by ants, rodents and other pests.
5.       Work with a pest professional. Eliminating ants can be challenge without the proper treatment. Some species of ants, like carpenter ants, can cause serious property damage while others can pose health threats. If you see ants in your home, contact a licensed pest professional to identify the species and recommend a course of treatment.

Great Shots from PCT’s Photo Contest

Friday, March 14th, 2014

Slideshow: Noteworthy 2013 Photo Contest Entries

Included in the February issue is the winning photo and finalist photos from PCT’s annual photo contest. PCT’s additional online coverage includes other noteworthy photos from the 2013 contest.

Click HERE to view

World’s biggest insect is so huge it eats carrots

Friday, February 21st, 2014

World’s biggest insect is so huge it eats carrots

Adventurer Mark Moffett has found the world’s biggest insect – which is so huge it can eat carrots.

Mark Moffett found the cricket-like creature, which weighs a staggering 71 grams: World's biggest insect is so huge it eats carrots

Mark Moffett found the cricket-like creature, which weighs a staggering 71 grams Photo: SOLENT

Former park ranger Mark, 53, discovered the giant weta up a tree and his real life Bug’s Bunny has now been declared the largest ever found.

He came across the cricket-like creature, which has a wing span of seven inches, after two days of searching on a tiny island.

The creepy crawly is only found on Little Barrier Island, in New Zealand.

The species were wiped off the mainland by rats accidentally introduced by Europeans.

After Mark found the female weta he fed it the carrot before putting it back where he found her.

Mark, 53, said: “Three of us walked the trails of this small island for two nights scanning the vegetation for a giant weta.

“We spent many hours with no luck finding any at all, before we saw her up in a tree.

“The giant weta is the largest insect in the world, and this is the biggest one ever found, she weighs the equivalent to three mice.

“She enjoyed the carrot so much she seemed to ignore the fact she was resting on our hands and carried on munching away.

“She would have finished the carrot very quickly, but this is an extremely endangered species and we didn’t want to risk indigestion.

“After she had chewed a little I took this picture and we put her right back where we found her.”

Mark, from Colorado, America, added: “We bug lovers hear a lot of people who think insects are inferior in some way because of their size, so it was great to see such a big insect.

“This became all the more amazing when we realized that this was the largest insect recorded.”