Posts Tagged ‘Bug Busters USA’

Battling Pests? Go Pro.

Friday, December 13th, 2013

Do-it-yourself or call a pest management professional (PMP)? That is a question many home and business owners ask themselves when dealing with insect pests. Avoid the risk of misusing chemicals or of pests returning and call a PMP. They are trained, certified and experienced technicians who provide the safest and most efficient treatments. Watch, share and repost this short video and remember — when you start seeing creepy crawlies, call a PMP and Go Pro!

Bug Busters USA encourages public awareness about insects of foreign origin

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

Invasive Species a Hindrance During Summer Months

Bug Busters USA encourages public awareness about insects of foreign origin

Invasive species, or insects of foreign origin, can cause major issues for American homeowners during the summer months. Bug Busters USA a pest management company servicing the Southeast, urges vigilance against invasive species including red imported fire ants (RIFAs), Asian tiger mosquitoes, brown marmorated stink bugs and Formosan termites as the weather continues to warm.

Most people are aware of the risks posed by common summer pests like ticks, mosquitoes and bees. However, invasive species can also cause property damage and, in some cases, injury to humans.

We encourage homeowners to also be on the lookout for the following invasive species this summer:

Red Imported Fire Ant (RIFA) – RIFAs were brought to the United States in 1930 from South America and are mainly found in the southern region of the country. When disturbed, they are known to swarm and sting humans, often causing painful welts on the skin.

Asian Tiger Mosquito – Originating from Southeast Asia, the Asian tiger mosquito is now found throughout the eastern, Midwestern and southern states. This mosquito species can cause an irritable bite and spread several diseases, including Dengue fever, West Nile virus and Japanese Encephalitis.

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug – Likely introduced from Eastern Asia, stink bugs are most prevalent in the northeast. While stink bugs don’t pose any health threats, they can produce an unpleasant odor when crushed.

Formosan Termite – Originally from China, Formosan termites are the most aggressive subterranean termite species. They are capable of consuming wood at rapid speeds, posing a serious structural threat to a property if left untreated.

Due to the health and property risks posed by invasive species, homeowners should frequently inspect the home for signs of an infestation and contact a licensed pest professional to treat any potential pest problems.

Incredible close-up photography reveals the usually unseen beauty and vibrant colours of the insect world

Monday, November 11th, 2013

Incredible close-up photography reveals the usually unseen beauty and vibrant colours of the insect world

  • Donald Jusa used the concept of macro photography to capture images.
  • Was only 3 centimeters away in order to shoot the amazing detail.
  • Each shot required the insects to be totally still.
  • Mr Jusa is a geologist at an Indonesian coal mining company.
  • The part-time photographer found the insects near his office.

October News from Bug Busters USA

Friday, November 1st, 2013

October News from Bug Busters USA

ABCNews.com: Tracking Giant Hornets That Have Killed At Least 42 People

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

ABCNews.com: Tracking Giant Hornets That Have Killed At Least 42 People

In a village on the outskirts if An Kang, China, a little girl, just 18-months-old, is dressed head-to-toe in clothing far too hot for the mild fall weather. Her mother removes one of her tiny socks and a still-gaping wound is revealed. An Asian Hornet stung the little girl there one month ago, releasing venom so potent multiple stings can cause kidney failure and death.

It was the only place her flesh was exposed, her mother explained. She gestures over the foot and up the shin, describing how swollen her daughter’s leg became. She was lucky to be stung just once, and survived. So now the girl’s parents make sure she wears socks. It is their best, and their only, defense.

An Kang is ground zero for the horrifying recent outbreak of Asian Hornet, or Giant Asian Hornet as the larger species is known, attacks on humans. Government figures put the death toll at 42 and the number of injured at 1,600. But officials at An Kang tell ABC News the actual number is much higher.

“These hornets have been killing people for some time,” said a city official who requested anonymity, “This year, just in this district more than 20 people have been killed. The number should be a lot higher than that. The number is shocking.”

The Asian Hornet, or Vespa Mandarinia, can grow to be thumb-sized. It is capable of flying at speeds of up to 25 mph and a distance of 50 miles. Their stingers carry a lethal mix of foreign protein that when mixed in the human bloodstream can cause sepsis. Without proper treatment, such as dialysis, a victim will die.

The insect’s existence in An Kang is not new. Nor is this the first time humans have been attacked. For years the Asian Hornet has lived among inhabitants here and elsewhere across East Asia. Parts of Japan in particular have been home to significant populations for years. But they have never attacked like they are attacking now.

Ren Chengan, 28, has lived on the outskirts of An Kang all his life. He remembers seeing hornets quite regularly while playing in the mountainside forest and along the riverbanks as a young boy. When he was around 8, he remembers, he was stung on the back of his head but suffered only minor swelling. Today, his family watches his young niece very carefully. Ren says it is no longer safe for children to play so freely.

During his youth, his family farmed a small piece of land. Eventually, with China’s rise, he says government officials instructed his family to stop farming and open a restaurant to cater to tourists. Ren believes the disruption in the co-existence of his family’s old way of life and the ecosystem of the forest has contributed to the outbreak in hornet attacks.

“If you didn’t bother them,” he says, “they would not bother you.”

Ren points out a hive across the river. It is high in a tree and on a mountain slope, far enough from the road so that passersby do not come close to it. It is possible to see a small swarm of hornets flying above it, but Ren is nonplussed. He guesses it contains up to a thousand of the killer insects.

There is no concrete explanation for why the hornets are attacking humans with such ferocity this year. Experts point to urban sprawl as one reason the hornet’s natural habitat has been compromised. Hives are now commonly found underground or in buildings. Left alone, the hornets typically don’t attack humans. But as humans and hornets live in increasing proximity of one another inadvertent disturbance can ignite a vicious response.

In a statement the government said it is doing its best to save people. At the start of September, an average of 30 to 40 people suffered stings daily. By Oct. 5 that number had dropped to 12, according to government figures. The government has been allocated 2 million RMB (just over $300,000) to hospitals to treat the injured. But many hospitals were not equipped to deal with the influx.

Emergency teams led by the fire department are working nest to nest in an attempt to destroy as many as possible. The government reports that more than 4,000 nests have been destroyed. But it is harder and harder to reach the more remote, rural hives. Accompanying one unit on a response call, the team was forced to trek on foot to the site. In full protective gear they used a massive, jerry-rigged torch to set the hive aflame until it was nothing more than a smoldering, charred remain.

“The hornets that survived have no more home,” said one member of the team. “They will die.”

But there is no guarantee. This year in particular, a mild winter and several months of hot weather may be behind an increased population. The Fang family of honey bee keepers told ABC News they are seeing many more hornets than before, and they are decimating their livelihood.

Asian Hornets attack honey bees every year in a particularly violent fashion, chewing their victims’ flesh into a powerful substance that boosts the hornet’s strength. It is common for a swarm of hornets to decimate a honeybee hive with ease.

Fang says he has lost 10 bee boxes this year; far more than in previous seasons. He estimates his loss at 30,000 RMB (just under $5,000) and says it will go higher as he loses money on next year’s crop.

His neighbor shows off a wound, an angry, crater-like round hole on his arm. When asked why he doesn’t go to a safer village, where he might have relatives, he says, “Where can I go? This is my home. I have nowhere to go.”

Officials hope the attacks drop by the end of the month and cease completely by December when the hornets retreat for winter. But next spring Queen Hornets will welcome thousands of new offspring.

As the ABC News team leaves town, word comes that a school has contacted the fire department. A hive has been found on school grounds, and they need help immediately.

What to do about ants in Atlanta Georgia | Bug Busters USA

Monday, October 28th, 2013

A trained and licensed pest professional is the best person to make a recommendation based on the proper identification of a particular ant species and the threats they could pose to health and property. Also, homeowners may have a preference as to which treatment is used, so it is important that they have a detailed conversation with their pest control company.  The cost of the treatments can vary depending on the size of the infestation and the property being treated.

There are as many ways to control ants as there are species of ants! Different species eat different things – making it almost impossible to inspect a single area and control the ant population.  The best strategy homeowners can employ when attempting to control ants is to clean, clean, clean. Wipe down counters, regularly remove garbage, clean up grease spills, rinse and remove empty soda cans or other recyclables and mop/sweep the floors. Homeowners should also keep food in sealed containers and keep pet food/water dishes clean. Outside the home, eliminate sources of moisture or standing water such as birdbaths or kiddie pools. Finally, seal cracks and holes around the home to close entry points.

Dung Beetles Gallop—Mystery Gait is a First Among Insects

Friday, October 25th, 2013

Critter Crafts – Worms in Dirt

Tuesday, October 15th, 2013

EPA | PestWise

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

PestWise is a collaborative suite of EPA partnership programs that promote environmental innovation in pest management where we live, work, learn, play, and farm. More About Us >>

 

Atlanta Bed Bug Exterminator

Monday, September 23rd, 2013

Click the image below to learn about bed bug control.