Posts Tagged ‘Bed bug control’

Bed Bugs: what they look like when they feed

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012

Bug Busters USA is Turning Up the Heat on Bed Bugs

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

Bug Busters USA is Turning Up the Heat on Bed Bugs

March 2012– Bug Busters USA is proud to announce that they are now offering Thermal Remediation® heat treatment service to the Southeast to battle insecticide-resistant bed bugs.

According to a recent survey conducted by the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) and the University of Kentucky, 99% of pest management professionals have encountered bed bugs in the last year and the majority agrees that bed bugs are the most difficult pest to control.

Heat, a safe and environmentally friendly solution, has been found to be a highly effective tool in the pest control toolbox.  Research performed at the University of Minnesota has shown that temperatures above 122°F will result in the complete and immediate kill of the entire life cycle of the bed bug, from eggs to adults.

Bug Busters will be using heating equipment that is specifically designed to kill bed bugs and is UL approved for safety as an insect control device.  Thermal Remediation® electric bed bug heaters are placed within the space with a target temperature of 135°F for the controlled application of heat.  High temperature fans move the heated air into cracks and crevices or high infestation zones.  A wireless temperature monitoring system is used to ensure lethal temperatures are reached without damaging the space and its contents.

Bug Busters USA is family owned and operated and has been for over 25 years! Bug Busters is environmentally friendly, people friendly, and pet friendly! All of the materials utilized are EPA approved to be lowest possible levels of toxicity with the highest level of effectiveness.  Bug Busters has been on the forefront of the increasing bed bug problem nationwide and has made it a priority to be able to meet this new challenge in pest management and better serve the community.  Please visit www.bugbustersusa.com, “like” us on Facebook or follow us on our blog and Twitter for more information and other helpful pest tips and tricks.

About Thermal Remediation® from Temp-Air:

Since 1965, Temp-Air, Inc. has been a leading provider of temporary, portable heating, cooling, dehumidifying, and air filtration rental services to the U.S. construction industry.  Building on that expertise, Thermal RemediationÒ from Temp-Air was developed over 10 years ago using heat as a safe, effective, and environmentally friendly alternative to chemical pest control applications.  Today Thermal RemediationÒ equipment is used by pest control professionals, property managers, hotels, universities, and food storage and processing plants throughout North America for the treatment of bed bugs and stored product pests.

Temp-Air is a privately held company based in Burnsville, MN with 11 regional offices nationwide.  For more information visit www.ThermalRemediation.com.

 

Malaria No More ~ “Netman” Comic for All Ages!

Friday, January 6th, 2012

Malaria No More Comic for All Ages!

Malaria No More is determined to end malaria deaths in Africa by 2015. Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease and recent progress shows that malaria’s days are numbered — but we need your help. Together, we can make malaria no more.

Health Scare of 2011 ~ Bedbugs

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

Health scare: Bedbugs via MSN

Bedbugs are notorious city dwellers. But now the little bloodsuckers are spreading so fast that even suburbanites are finding them under mattresses and in dark corners. Infestations leaped by as much as 30 percent in 2011, according to a new survey from the National Pest Management Association (NPMA). The reason for the spike isn’t entirely clear, though the study points to an uptick in travel, bedbugs’ increased resistance to pesticides, and a lack of education on how to stop their spread.

Outlook for 2012: Scientists recently convened in Washington, D.C., for the Second National Bed Bug Summit, but it may be a while before we see the results of their strategizing. After the meeting, the EPA awarded 1-to 2-year research grants to explore new methods of eradication. In the meantime, you can expect the spread to continue: The little buggers are among the toughest pests to eradicate, according to the NPMA.

Protect yourself: Bedbugs like to hide near their food source-sleeping humans-so check around your sheets, pillowcases, and mattress for tiny black spots (excrement), reddish spots (crushed bugs), small white eggs, or bloodstains. If you suspect you’re sleeping with the enemy, place a Climbup Insect Interceptor Bed Bug Monitor and Trap ($20) under each leg of your bed. A slick layer of talc lining the traps will capture any passing pests. Catch a couple? Call an exterminator who’s trained in dealing with bedbugs. Click here for even more ways to eliminate germs from your life.

Bedbugs’ Rampant Incest Colonizes Entire Apartment Buildings, Study Finds

Thursday, December 15th, 2011

Bedbugs’ Rampant Incest Colonizes Entire Apartment Buildings, Study Finds

By Elizabeth Lopa

Like any truly bad roommate, a single female bedbug can infest an entire apartment, a study shows.

Bedbugs inbreed without ill effects, the researchers said, so even a single female bedbug can lead to a colony of the blood-sucking insects as a result of rampant incest.

Three colonized buildings in North Carolina and New Jersey suggested the invasion started with only one or two insects. Another study traced 21 infestations from Maine to Florida and found most began in a single room.

“This tells us it’s absolutely critical to detect bedbugs early,” said Coby Schal, an urban entomology professor at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, in a telephone interview. “The bed bugs were introduced once, which suggests the frequency of introductions is low. It’s a rare event.”

Bedbugs were almost eliminated in the U.S. 60 years ago by the pesticide DDT. International travel probably aided a resurgence in the past 30 years, said Schal, also a study author. The research was presented today at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in Philadelphia. While their bites cause itchy allergic reactions, they don’t spread disease.

The number of infestations from the insects, which feed only on blood, has grown as much as 100-fold since 1990, said Rajeev Vaidyanathan, associate director of diseases from animals at SRI International, which is based in Menlo Park, California, in a statement.

Bedbugs’ Rampant Incest Colonizes Entire Apartment Buildings, Study Finds

Thursday, December 15th, 2011

Bedbugs’ Rampant Incest Colonizes Entire Apartment Buildings, Study Finds

By Elizabeth Lopa

Like any truly bad roommate, a single female bedbug can infest an entire apartment, a study shows.

Bedbugs inbreed without ill effects, the researchers said, so even a single female bedbug can lead to a colony of the blood-sucking insects as a result of rampant incest.

Three colonized buildings in North Carolina and New Jersey suggested the invasion started with only one or two insects. Another study traced 21 infestations from Maine to Florida and found most began in a single room.

“This tells us it’s absolutely critical to detect bedbugs early,” said Coby Schal, an urban entomology professor at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, in a telephone interview. “The bed bugs were introduced once, which suggests the frequency of introductions is low. It’s a rare event.”

Bedbugs were almost eliminated in the U.S. 60 years ago by the pesticide DDT. International travel probably aided a resurgence in the past 30 years, said Schal, also a study author. The research was presented today at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in Philadelphia. While their bites cause itchy allergic reactions, they don’t spread disease.

The number of infestations from the insects, which feed only on blood, has grown as much as 100-fold since 1990, said Rajeev Vaidyanathan, associate director of diseases from animals at SRI International, which is based in Menlo Park, California, in a statement.

Bedbugs in The News

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

Bedbugs are in the news again. Check out this article below from the Charlotte Observer.

County vs. hotel, bed bugs

Health department wants to close hotel for infestation, but loophole won’t allow it.

By Fred Clasen-Kelly
frkelly@charlotteobserver.com
Posted: Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011
Bedbug Insecticide Risk

Bedbug infestations have resurfaced in recent years. They don’t spread disease but cause itching and scabs. Carolyn Kaster – AP

The Mecklenburg County Health Department wants to close a north Charlotte hotel after receiving at least a dozen complaints of bedbugs this year.

But officials concede the Charlotte Garden Inn likely will remain open.

That’s because state law would allow it to continue to operate as a weekly hotel that is unregulated for health and sanitation.

Virtually wiped out of the United States 40 years ago, bedbugs have resurfaced in recent years in North Carolina and across the country.

The latest complaint against the Garden Inn comes from a minister who said her church paid for two homeless men to stay in a room there earlier this month.

When the men alleged bedbugs left bite marks across their bodies, the church demanded a refund, said Wanda Gipson, pastor of Freedom Ministries of Jesus Christ International.

But hotel workers gave the church only $71 of the $160 it had paid, she said.

“They need to be shut down,” Gipson said.

Acting on another complaint about the same room, health inspectors this week confirmed a bedbug infestation, said Bobby Cobb, Mecklenburg deputy health director.

Charlotte Garden Inn management did not return calls to the Observer seeking comment.

Bedbugs, often found in bedding, luggage or clothing, do not spread disease, but their bites cause itching and scabs. Infections can result from scratching bite marks.

Catawba College in Salisbury closed half the campus dorms last fall when an infestation was discovered.

There have been 67 reported cases in Mecklenburg County this year, Cobb said.

County health officials filed paperwork in September to revoke Charlotte Garden Inn’s license after it scored 73.5 on an annual sanitation inspection, Cobb said. If the hotel had scored four points lower, Cobb said authorities could have shut down the business immediately.

He said hotel management at one point this year exterminated bedbugs from the building with pesticide treatments, but the bedbugs returned.

In October, the Garden Inn filed an appeal with the N.C. Office of Administrative Hearings, allowing it to continue to rent rooms. A hearing is set for February.

Even if the hotel loses, Cobb said, it can remain in business by converting nightly rooms into weekly rentals. Under North Carolina law, local health departments can only regulate sanitation in nightly hotel rooms.

“Seems to me there is a giant hole in N.C. law,” said Mecklenburg Commissioner Bill James, who asked the Health Department to investigate complaints against the Garden Inn and another nearby hotel off Interstate 85 near the Sugar Creek Road exit.

In an email sent to the Health Department this week, James wrote: “Hotels and motels that are allowed to operate just perpetuate the cycle and increase the likelihood that individuals staying at such facilities transfer the bedbugs back to churches, schools, homes and other public places including county offices.”

Gipson, the pastor, said her church paid for the two men to stay at Garden Inn for two weeks. After about a week, she said they had to move the men to another hotel because there were so many bedbugs in the room the men were able to collect them in a cup.

When hotel management learned that the men had contacted city government officials about the bedbugs, they kicked them out and did not allow them to retrieve all of their belongings, Gipson said.

“These people should not be allowed to rent to anyone no matter what the price,” she said.

Cobb, the Health Department deputy director, said he was aware of Gipson’s complaints, but his agency has no authority to investigate because the church rented the rooms on a weekly basis.

Clasen-Kelly: 704-358-5027

Read more: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2011/11/12/2768313/county-vs-hotel-bedbugs.html#ixzz1dkmfuyAb

PEST PROOFING YOUR HOME FOR THE WINTER

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

When it gets colder outside, pests look for a place to live inside.  Our homes are the most likely refuge. It is something we experience every year and homeowners need to take steps during the fall to pest proof for the winter months.

With a cool, moist summer and spring in the Northeast, and extreme moisture in the South from hurricanes, you can expect to see a heavy pest season this winter.  Pests love moisture and, after such a wet summer and fall, they’ve been given an opportunity to thrive.

We are already seeing an increase in calls to professional pest control companies about infestations this fall.  Mice, squirrels, spiders and insects are already beginning to move in for the winter.  Compared to last year, we are already seeing up to a 35% increase in calls to professional pest control companies about these types of infestations.

This time of year, the house mouse is the most common pest in and around homes as well as spiders, squirrels and small insects. While spiders, for the most part, are not aggressive, many homeowners and children find them frightening.  Mice on the other hand can be dangerous as they eat and contaminate our food, chew up woodwork and can create electrical fires by gnawing on wires. Other rodents such as chipmunks, squirrels, raccoons, and opossums can get into open areas seeking food

Pests are adaptable and will always seek shelter from the cold.  Most times the shelter is in our homes and businesses.  Homeowners who do not pest proof their homes are taking a real chance.  Pests are always drawn to conducive conditions.  Unfortunately, the warmth, shelter and food found in our homes are just irresistible to pests, especially in winter moths.

Although some homeowners may have higher pest tolerance than others, pests can create major havoc inside a home, ultimately creating a dangerous and potentially costly situation for a homeowner.  People who decide against pest proofing for the winter could be unintentionally creating prime conditions for property-damaging pests like termites to surface in the spring.

Bug Busters USA and The National Pest Management Association recommends the following steps to pest proof your home:

  1. Seal up any cracks and holes on the outside of your home including areas where utilities and pipes enter your home. Frequent vacuuming can help to eliminate tiny pests that other pests feed on.
  2. Make sure vents are screened and gaps around windows and doors are sealed.
  3. Keep tree branches and shrubbery well trimmed and away from the house.
  4. Inspect boxes, grocery bags and other packaging thoroughly to curb hitchhiking insects.
  5. Keep basements, attics, and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  6. Store garbage in sealed containers and dispose of it regularly.
  7. Store fire wood at least 20 feet away from the house and five inches off of the ground.
  8. Repair fascia and soffits and rotted roof shingles; some insects are drawn to deteriorating wood.
  9. Replace weather-stripping and repair loose mortar around the basement foundation and windows.
  10. A licensed and qualified pest control professional such as Bug Busters USA is your best resource to ensure these steps are completed properly.

Some things can be done by a homeowner, however a professional knows the habits and biology of the pests that come into our homes.  This time of year we get a lot of calls because homeowners are frustrated — they’ve tried to keep pests out and can’t figure out where they are living.

If you are already seeing signs of pests inside your home – such as rodent droppings – it is always a good idea to call a professional pest control company.  They can help you identify where pests are entering your home, what they are feeding on, and how to eliminate the conducive conditions.

You can also visit Bugbustersusa.com where we have a list of our services.

Got Bed Bugs?

Locations

Bed Bugs Biting Back!

Monday, October 24th, 2011

Bed Bugs Biting Back!

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (Ivanhoe Newswire) — You may not be going to bed alone. After years of winning the war against bed bugs, they’re back! Not only have they returned, but they’re stronger and insecticide resistant. New research from a team at Virginia Tech has discovered some of the genetic mechanisms for the bugs’ resistance to two of the most popular insecticides used to control them.

Bed bugs, largely absent in the U.S. since the 1950s, have returned with a vengeance in all 50 states during the last few decades. Previously, a class of insecticides, known as pyrethoids, was successful in controlling the pests. Unfortunately, the new bugs have developed a resistance to them.

The discoveries will accelerate efforts to understand the biochemical basis for insecticide resistance in bed bugs. It also provides molecular markers for surveillance.

“Different bed bug populations within the U.S. and throughout the world may differ in their levels of resistance and resistance strategies, so there is the need for continuous surveillance,” lead author Zach Adelman, associate professor of entomology with the Vector-Borne Disease Research Group at Virginia Tech was quoted as saying.

Two populations of bed bugs were studied. The first, a resistant population from Richmond, Va., collected in 2008. The second had been collected in 1973 from Ft. Dix, NJ, and raised in a lab ever since.

Two popular insecticides, deltamethrin and beta-cyfulthrin, were used during the study. The researchers determined that it requires 5,200 times more deltamethrin or 111 times more beta-cyfulthrin to kill the Richmond bed bugs than the lab bugs during a 24-hour test.

“Deep sequencing of pyrethoid-resistant bed bugs reveals multiple mechanisms of resistance within a single population,” the authors wrote.

The research team was able to identify genes that are commonly used to produce enzymes that can bind to, deactivate, and break down insecticides. In the resistant bugs, production of some of these enzymes was turned up significantly.

Mutations were also found in the sodium channel gene of the resistant bugs. This gene is the target for pyrethoid insecticides. The mutation makes the bed bug’s nervous system partially resistant to the toxic effects of the insecticide.

“It is reasonable to suggest that the genes responsible for both acquired insensitivity to these neurotoxicants and their enhanced detoxification have been selected for in populations that have been subjected to long-term insecticide pressure,” the authors concluded.

SOURCE: PLoS One, published online October 19, 2011

Bed Bug Control ~ Not a DIY Project!

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

Not a DIY Project: Eradicating bed bugs can make you sick

By Rita Colorito

In an effort to sleep tight and not let the bed bugs bite, some Americans have gotten sick from do-it-yourself eradication methods, according to a recent report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.

The FYI on bed bug DIY

Researchers used federal data on illnesses linked to bed bug eradication efforts reported between 2003 and 2010. Of the 111 cases reported in seven states, 93 percent were among people who tried the DIY method to solve the infestation.

Most of the illnesses reported involved headache and dizziness, pain and difficulty while breathing, and nausea and vomiting. Many were workers who visited the homes, such as carpet cleaners or EMS technicians, and who had not been told that insecticides had recently been used. Though most of the illnesses resolved on their own in about a day, but 18 percent of the cases required medical attention.

In one extreme incidence cited by the CDC report, a woman in North Carolina, with several existing health issues, died after her husband used too much of a bed bug-ineffective pesticide, over several days, to get rid of the nighttime bloodsuckers. She also sprayed her arms, hair and chest with the pesticide, and with a flea insecticide, before going to bed.

Get professional help instead

“If you can’t control bed bugs with non-chemical means, such as washing and vacuuming, that means it’s probably going to be difficult to eradicate them, and we would recommend that people enlist the services of a pest control operator,” said report co-author Geoffrey Calvert, M.D., M.P.H., a medical officer at the U.S. National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health in a released statement.

But make sure the exterminator you hire is licensed and qualified; if not, the results can be disastrous. One uncertified exterminator used malathion, an organophosphate insecticide not registered for indoor use, up to five times a day over three days in an apartment to treat a bed bug infestation, saturating beds and floor coverings, according to the CDC report. He pleaded guilty to criminal charges and was fined after children living there required medical help and the apartment was rendered uninhabitable.

An ounce of prevention

The National Pest Management Association has an All Things Bed Bugs page with information on bed bug prevention as well as breaking news of bed bug infestations nationwide, i.e., places you’ll want to avoid. In addition, check out BedBugRegistry.com, a free, public database of bedbug sightings in the United States and Canada.

Travel site Frommers.com also put together a recent piece on how to stop bed bugs from hitchhiking home from your travels. Prevention tips include using hard sided luggage which makes it more difficult for the pests to settle in, inspecting your room thoroughly upon arrival, especially any nooks and crannies near the headboard, and keeping your luggage in the bathroom while you inspect said room.

In fact, use this check-in checklist to make sure your home away from home won’t send critters back with you:

* Throw your luggage in the bathtub, it’s usually white so it’s easier to see any creepy crawlies and also a bit too smooth for them to easily crawl into.

* Then, yank all the bedspreads, sheets and mattress covers off the entire mattress perimeter and get on your hands and knees to inspect the baseboards in the room. If you see brown spots or other obvious signs, call the front desk and ask for a new room.

* Repeat the process with the new room.

But you can ease your anxiety, by perusing online hotel review sites to see whether anyone has complained about bedbugs at a hotel you’re considering booking. If you read online reports of bed bugs, call the hotel to confirm what you’ve read — something to do whenever you read online complaints of any ill service somewhere. Ultimately, you’ll have to decide for yourself what is a legitimate complaint and what is simply Internet badmouthing. When it comes to bed bugs, prevention definitely beats eradication.