Posts Tagged ‘Atlanta Termite Control’

IT’S TERMITE SEASON! PROTECT YOUR HOME FROM AN INFESTATION

Monday, March 6th, 2017

 

Bug Busters works to educate homeowners of termite threats and offers prevention tips

Bug Busters and the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) are working to spread public awareness about termites during Termite Awareness Week, March 12-18, 2017. Bug Busters is proud to participate in this annual observance by educating homeowners on ways to make their homes less attractive to termite colonies.

As spring approaches, termites seek out moisture-damaged homes and can quickly chew through wood, flooring and even wallpaper undetected. Once a colony is established, the damage they cause can be quite severe. According to the NPMA, termite infestations cause more than $5 billion in property damage each year – an expense typically not covered by homeowners insurance.

“Termites usually emerge with the arrival of warmer weather in spring,” says Bug Busters Chief Operating Officer Court Parker.”

Termites can be difficult to spot with the naked eye, but homeowners should remain vigilant and make every effort to eliminate or reduce moisture around their home to help ward off an infestation.”

Bug Busters offers the following termite prevention tips:

  • Divert water away from your home’s foundation by installing properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.
  • Reduce humidity in crawl spaces with proper ventilation.
  • Trim vines, hedges and other vegetation to prevent them from blocking vents.
  • Remove old form boards, grade stakes, tree trunks and roots near a building, as they may attract termites.
  • Maintain an 18-inch gap between soil and any wood portions of your home.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and 5 inches off the ground. Check it for pests before bringing it indoors.
  • Routinely inspect the foundation of your home for signs of termite damage.

 

 

“Homeowners who notice signs of termites or potential termite damage should contact a pest professional who can best determine the extent of the problem and recommend a proper course of action,” added Parker.

For more information on pest prevention for all seasons, please visit bugbustersusa.com. For further details on scheduling an interview with a Bug Busters expert who can share ever more creepy crawly facts and pest-prevention ideas, please contactcourt@bugbustersusa.com or
1-800-210-6262

Flying Ant or Termite?

Friday, August 5th, 2016

Atlanta Termite Control

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

It is no secret that termites cause billions of dollars of damage every year in the United States. They prey on building foundations, joists, studs and even furniture once they get inside. Getting rid of them can be both difficult and expensive.  In reality, termites are not looking for a “house” to munch on. What they want is something called organic cellulose usually found in dead plants and trees.

Termites inhabit colonies that can consist of a quarter million or more. They usually live in the soil or in the wood they consume. They can be found in dead tree stumps or in mounds built to house their colonies. Termites swarm in the spring, which is when they are most noticeable. A homeowner may notice mud tunnels they make as they transport food sources.

The key to living with termites is to stop them from moving in. Termites thrive in moist conditions, so it is essential to take the following steps:

1.       Eliminate moisture around your home.

  1. Repair leaking faucets, water pipes and air conditioning units. Divert water away from your home’s foundation, keep gutters and downspouts clean and get rid of standing water on your roof.  Also remove excessive plant cover, wood mulch and seal entry points around water and utility lines or pipes.

2.       Remove food sources.

  1.  Keep firewood, yard debris and lumber away from your home’s foundation or crawl space.

3.       Inspect your home’s foundation regularly.

  1. Drywood termites burrow mazes of tunnels and chambers within walls and furniture and leave behind feeces that resemble pellets. After they swarm, they shed wings, which may be found in small piles around your home. Subterranean termites construct tunnels from mud, their feces and saliva. The presence of these tunnels near the foundation of your home is a pretty good indicator of a termite infestation.

4.       Reduce openings that offer access to your home.

  1.  Use cement, grout or caulk to fill cracks in foundations as well as around the spots where utilities pass through the wall.

5.       Plant carefully.

  1.  Ensure that trees and shrubs are not planted too close to the structure and do not allow them to grow against exposed wood surfaces.

6.       Inspect periodically.

  1.  If you do see a termite colony, you will want to destroy them immediately.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/how-to-spot-and-treat-termites.html

What kind of damage do termites cause?

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

Georgia Termite Control

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

While swarmers and their discarded wings are the most visible sign of a termite problem, here are five other warning signs homeowners should know:

  1. Mud tubes (used by termites to reach a food source) on the exterior of the home
  2. Soft wood in the home that sounds hollow when tapped
  3. Cracked or bubbling paint
  4. Small piles of feces that resembles sawdust that may evidence a termite nest
  5. Rotted tree stumps or landscaping timbers in close proximity to the home

bug busters hybrid 001

Termite prevention tips:

  • Keep basements, attics and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry
  • Repair leaking faucets, water pipes and AC units on the outside of the home
  • Repair fascia and soffits and rotted roof shingles
  • Replace weather stripping and repair loose mortar around basement foundation and windows
  • Direct water away from your house through properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and 5 inches off the ground
  • Keep mulch at least 15 inches from the foundation

 

What can a homeowner do to prevent termites in the Suutheast?

Friday, February 14th, 2014

What can a homeowner do to prevent termites?

  • Since termites are attracted to moisture, avoid moisture accumulation near your home’s foundation. Divert water away with properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.
  • Reduce humidity in crawl spaces with proper ventilation or dehumidification. Prevent shrubs, vines and other vegetation from growing over and covering vents.
  • Before and during construction, never bury wood scraps or waste lumber in the backfill, especially near the building. Be sure to remove old form boards, grade stakes, etc., left in place after the building was constructed. Remove old tree stumps and roots around and beneath the building.
  • Most importantly, eliminate any wood contact with the soil. An 18-inch gap between the soil and wood portions of the building is ideal.

What can a homeowner do to prevent termites?

Monday, July 29th, 2013

What can a homeowner do to prevent termites?

  • Since termites are attracted to moisture, avoid moisture accumulation near your home’s foundation. Divert water away with properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.
  • Reduce humidity in crawl spaces with proper ventilation or dehumidification. Prevent shrubs, vines and other vegetation from growing over and covering vents.
  • Before and during construction, never bury wood scraps or waste lumber in the backfill, especially near the building. Be sure to remove old form boards, grade stakes, etc., left in place after the building was constructed. Remove old tree stumps and roots around and beneath the building.
  • Most importantly, eliminate any wood contact with the soil. An 18-inch gap between the soil and wood portions of the building is ideal.

Termite Q & A

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

What do you do when you’ve found your dream home, but discover that it’s crawling with termites?

The truth is, there are two kinds of homes: those that have had termites and those that will get them.  And, while they cause $5 billion in damage each year, there is no reason to run away from the purchase.  A pest control professional can correct the problem so that you can live comfortably in your dream home.

How difficult are termites to treat?

Termites are nearly impossible for homeowners to treat on their own.  On the other hand, pest control professionals have the training, expertise, equipment, and technology to eliminate termite infestations.

How much does a termite treatment cost?

They can range anywhere from $800 to $1,800 dollars, depending on where you live, the construction of your home, severity of the infestation, and the type of contract offered by your pest control professional.  Your pest control professional will give you a free estimate.

What are the different types of termite treatments?

There are two primary types of treatments available for use by the professional: liquids and baits.  Liquids are used around a home area to ensure long-term protection or used to treat wood directly. Baits systems involve placing monitoring stations in the ground.

Are these products dangerous to kids and pets?

All professional pest control products have been registered for use by the EPA.

When they are applied according to label instructions by technicians who have been trained and licensed to use them, they pose little risk. Also, the products are applied in areas not frequented by people (under soil surface, in walls, in stations under the soil).

What is the most effective type of termite treatment?

A trained and licensed pest control operator is the best person to make a recommendation for each particular property. Also, homeowners might have a preference as to which technology to use so it is important that they have a detailed conversation with their pest control company.

Why should someone hire a professional instead of attempting to control their pest problems by themselves?

Just as you wouldn’t prescribe medicine for yourself or drill your own cavities – you shouldn’t attempt to control termites – or other pests — on your own. The products and the expertise offered by professional pest control far surpasses what a homeowner could do on their own.  Leave it up to the experts for peace of mind. Why risk it?

What questions should homeowners ask during a professional termite inspection/treatment?

  • What type of treatment is recommended?
  • How long will the treatment take?
  • How much will it cost?
  • How long will it take to get rid of the termites?
  • What type of contract or guarantee is offered?
  • Are they a member of the National Pest Management Association?

How long does a termite treatment typically take?

Termite treatments typically will take no more than a day.

How long until the termites are gone?

That depends on the location, extent of damage, and the products used to treat the infestation.  After a thorough inspection, your professional pest control company should be able to tell you what they will use to get rid of the termites and how long it will take.

What can a homeowner do to prevent termites?

  • The most common types of termites love moisture, if you have any moisture around the foundation of your home, take steps to remove the moisture and eliminate the source.
  • Divert water away with properly functioning downspouts, gutters and splash blocks.
  • Reduce humidity in crawl spaces with proper ventilation.
  • Prevent shrubs, vines and other vegetation from growing over and covering vents.
  • Be sure to remove old form boards, grade stakes, etc., left in place after the building was constructed. Remove old tree stumps and roots around and beneath the building.
  • Most importantly, eliminate any wood contact with the soil. An 18-inch gap between the soil and wood portions of the building is ideal.
  • It doesn’t hurt to routinely inspect the foundation of your home for signs of termite damage.

Can pests other than termites damage property?

Absolutely. Carpenter ants, carpenter bees and powder post beetles are all categorized as wood destroying insects.  That’s why it’s important to have a professional identify the source of your problem and provide the treatment to control it.

What should a homeowner look for when selecting a PCO?

  • A qualified and licensed pest management company that is a member of national, state or local pest management associations.
  • Ask friends and neighbors to recommend companies they have used successfully.
  • Buy value, not price.
  • Before signing a contract, be sure to fully understand the nature of the pest to be controlled, the extent of the infestation, and the work necessary to solve the problem.
  • Find out if the company has liability insurance to cover any damages to your house or furnishings during treatment.
  • If a guarantee is given, know what it covers, how long it lasts, what you must do to keep it in force, and what kind of continuing prevention and management are necessary. 

If you hire a pest control professional, are you guaranteed a pest-free home?

Pest control companies differ in their guarantees. Pests and pest conditions constantly change around a home, so pests can come back. If a guarantee is given, know what it covers, how long it lasts, what you must do to keep it in force, and what kind of continuing prevention and management are necessary.

It is important that homeowners remain active participants before, during and after all pest control treatments.   This type of vigilance helps the homeowner better understand their contract and possible guarantee, and helps the PCO understand the homeowner’s expectations.

Termites can help predict the impact of climate change

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

As it turns out termites, those pesky critters that can destroy your family’s home may actually help predict the ecological changes shaped by climate change. According to the study by the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology termites are careful builders that locate their mounds in areas with the right balance of moisture and drainage and this intuitive understanding of geology and hydrology can help explain how a local ecosystem might evolve. “By understanding the patterns of the vegetation and termite mounds over different moisture zones, we can project how the landscape might change with climate change,” explains co-author Greg Asner.

Check out the Study: Termites help predict impact of climate change