Posts Tagged ‘Atlanta Ant Control’

Ant Control Tips from Bug Busters USA

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

Experts from Bug Busters USA recommend the following five simple steps that homeowners can do today to thwart an ant infestation.

1.       Block off access points. Take time to inspect the outside of your home for cracks and crevices, paying special attention to areas where utility pipes enter. Seal any small holes or gaps with a silicone-based caulk. Keep tree branches and other shrubbery well trimmed and away from the structure.
2.       Eliminate sources of water in and around the home. Indoors, routinely check under sinks for areas of moisture and repair any leaky pipes. Consider using a dehumidifier in damp basements, crawl spaces or attics. Outside, ensure that downspouts and gutters are functioning properly so that water flows away from the home’s foundation.
3.       Keep a clean kitchen. Wipe down counter tops and sweep floors to remove crumbs and residue from spills. Store food in sealed containers, and keep ripe fruit in the refrigerator. Also, make sure to dispose of garbage regularly.
4.       Don’t forget about the pets. After mealtime, keep pet bowls clean and wipe up any spilled food or water around them promptly. Store dry pet food in a sealed plastic container rather than the paper bags they often come in, which can be easily accessed by ants, rodents and other pests.
5.       Work with a pest professional. Eliminating ants can be challenge without the proper treatment. Some species of ants, like carpenter ants, can cause serious property damage while others can pose health threats. If you see ants in your home, contact a licensed pest professional to identify the species and recommend a course of treatment.

Great Shots from PCT’s Photo Contest

Friday, March 14th, 2014

Slideshow: Noteworthy 2013 Photo Contest Entries

Included in the February issue is the winning photo and finalist photos from PCT’s annual photo contest. PCT’s additional online coverage includes other noteworthy photos from the 2013 contest.

Click HERE to view

World’s biggest insect is so huge it eats carrots

Friday, February 21st, 2014

World’s biggest insect is so huge it eats carrots

Adventurer Mark Moffett has found the world’s biggest insect – which is so huge it can eat carrots.

Mark Moffett found the cricket-like creature, which weighs a staggering 71 grams: World's biggest insect is so huge it eats carrots

Mark Moffett found the cricket-like creature, which weighs a staggering 71 grams Photo: SOLENT

Former park ranger Mark, 53, discovered the giant weta up a tree and his real life Bug’s Bunny has now been declared the largest ever found.

He came across the cricket-like creature, which has a wing span of seven inches, after two days of searching on a tiny island.

The creepy crawly is only found on Little Barrier Island, in New Zealand.

The species were wiped off the mainland by rats accidentally introduced by Europeans.

After Mark found the female weta he fed it the carrot before putting it back where he found her.

Mark, 53, said: “Three of us walked the trails of this small island for two nights scanning the vegetation for a giant weta.

“We spent many hours with no luck finding any at all, before we saw her up in a tree.

“The giant weta is the largest insect in the world, and this is the biggest one ever found, she weighs the equivalent to three mice.

“She enjoyed the carrot so much she seemed to ignore the fact she was resting on our hands and carried on munching away.

“She would have finished the carrot very quickly, but this is an extremely endangered species and we didn’t want to risk indigestion.

“After she had chewed a little I took this picture and we put her right back where we found her.”

Mark, from Colorado, America, added: “We bug lovers hear a lot of people who think insects are inferior in some way because of their size, so it was great to see such a big insect.

“This became all the more amazing when we realized that this was the largest insect recorded.”

Zombie Ants!

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

Sir David Attenborough and the Planet Earth team discover the weird world of the Cordyceps; killer fungi that invades the body of an insect to grow and diminish the insect population. Fascinating animal and wildlife video from the BBC epic natural world masterpiece ‘Planet Earth’.

Ant Control Tips from Bug Busters USA

Monday, October 14th, 2013

There are more than 700 species of ants in the United States. Some of the most common include argentine, carpenter, odorous house, pavement and red imported fire ants.

All ants are social insects that live in colonies. They can be identified by their three distinct body regions: head, thorax, and abdomen. However, the biology and habits of each ant species is different and understanding these differences is necessary to effectively control an infestation.

Ants are commonly attracted to the food in a kitchen, especially sweets and protein-containing substances. Ants are most often found on floors, countertops and in food items. Some species prefer to build nests in soil – such as landscaping – or cracks in concrete on your driveway, walkway or in your garage. Carpenter ants build nests in wood. Ants are typically found indoors the spring and summer months as they search for food.

Most species of ants are considered ‘nuisance pests,’ meaning that they don’t pose a significant threat to health or property, but are an annoyance when found indoors. In fact, ants are the number one nuisance pest in the United States.

Some species of ants, however, can pose threats to health and property. Carpenter ants, for example, excavate wood in order to build their nests, which can cause extensive damage to a structure. Fire ants, on the other hand, sting when threatened, resulting in painful welts that can be dangerous to allergic persons. These species should always be handled by a professional.

Regardless of the species all ants can contaminate food sources and small infestations can grow quickly, so any sign of an infestation should be dealt with promptly.

A trained and licensed pest professional is the best person to make a recommendation based on the proper identification of a particular ant species and the threats they could pose to health and property. Also, homeowners may have a preference as to which treatment is used, so it is important that they have a detailed conversation with their pest control company.  The cost of the treatments can vary depending on the size of the infestation and the property being treated.

There are as many ways to control ants as there are species of ants! Different species eat different things – making it almost impossible to inspect a single area and control the ant population.  The best strategy homeowners can employ when attempting to control ants is to clean, clean, clean. Wipe down counters, regularly remove garbage, clean up grease spills, rinse and remove empty soda cans or other recyclables and mop/sweep the floors. Homeowners should also keep food in sealed containers and keep pet food/water dishes clean. Outside the home, eliminate sources of moisture or standing water such as birdbaths or kiddie pools. Finally, seal cracks and holes around the home to close entry points.

If homeowners are worried that they have an ant problem, they should call a pest professional to identify the species and recommend a course of action.  You can search for a local and qualified pest professional using the zip code locator on PestWorld.org.

Aggressive Ant Species Marches Through South

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

Aggressive Ant Species Marches Through South


Fire ants have long been a threat in the southern United States, but another aggressive ant species known as the tawny crazy ant is taking over in many areas of the region. These ants can invade structures in extraordinary numbers and, Bug Busters USA, a pest management company servicing the Southeast,  is advising homeowners to take preventative steps to protect their properties from infestations.

Crazy ants enter homes in the autumn or after rainfall because both conditions reduce their supply of honeydew. Once inside, crazy ants usually nest underneath floors or in wall voids. Outdoors, their nests are commonly found in soil under objects or next to foundations.

To prevent crazy ants from gaining access to a structure utilize these tips:

  • Trim vegetation away from the home to prevent pathways inside.
  • Seal all cracks and crevices on the outside of the home, including around doors and windows.
  • Clean up food spills and other potential attractants as soon as possible.
  • If an infestation is suspected, contact a licensed pest professional to treat the problem.

For more information on crazy ants, please visit www.bugbustersusa.com

Many Allergic to Fire Ant’s Sting Don’t Get Preventive Shots

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

USNews.com: Many Allergic To Fire Ant’s Sting Don’t Get Preventive Shots

For some people, a sting from the ubiquitous fire ant can provoke potentially severe reactions, but a new study finds that only one-third of people with such allergies get shots that can ease the danger.

“Patients are fearful of the injections, and often feel that the time investment will never pay off in the long run,” said one expert, Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency medicine physician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Allergy shots to protect against fire ant stings are typically given monthly to provide the best protection. This treatment has been shown to prevent allergy progression and to reduce the risk of anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction that can be deadly.

However, “the time commitment is significant and typically involves monthly injections over a 3- to 5-year period,” said Glatter, who was not involved in the new study.

So, despite the potential benefit, the new study found that only 35 percent of patients with fire ant allergies continued to get allergy shots after one year. Inconvenience and fear were among the reasons why they stopped getting the treatment.

The findings were published in the March issue of the journalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

“Immunotherapy is proven to be safe and efficient at treating allergic diseases,” study lead author Dr. Shayne Stokes, chief of allergy and immunology at Luke AFB in Arizona, said in a news release from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). “It can also result in health care savings of 33 to 41 percent.”

Fire ants are common throughout the southeastern United States. People who have had an allergic reaction to a fire ant sting in the past have a 60 percent chance of experiencing a similar or more severe reaction if stung again, according to the ACAAI.

Symptoms of a fire ant allergy can include: hives, itching and swelling in areas other than the sting site; abdominal cramping, intense nausea, vomiting or diarrhea; tightness in the chest and difficulty breathing; hoarse voice or swelling of the tongue or throat, or difficulty swallowing; anaphylaxis, which can include dizziness, a sharp drop in blood pressure or cardiac arrest.

“The reality is that if allergy shots for fire ant stings were utilized more often, patients would have milder reactions if a sting occurred — and thus a lower chance or need for a visit to an emergency department,” Glatter said. “The subsequent risk for anaphylaxis would also be significantly reduced. Overall, the need for other ‘rescue medications’ to treat the allergic reactions from the fire ants — including steroids and epinephrine — may potentially be reduced as well.”

People who have an allergic reaction should seek immediate medical help and follow up with an allergist, the ACAAI said.

Glatter said that “patients with asthma, sleep apnea, COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease] and other chronic lung diseases may be at added risk for airway compromise should a subsequent reaction occur, and should be considered for [the allergy shots].”

Two million Americans are allergic to insect stings, an allergy that sends more than 500,000 people to hospital emergency rooms each year.

A World of Ants

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

A World of Ants

Alex Wild

Research photographs on ants. Anna Dornhaus is studying whether the efficiency of ant society is important to their success

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2009/04/27/science/042809-Ants_index.html