Archive for the ‘Mosquito Control Services’ Category

Mosquito Control Services

Tuesday, May 2nd, 2017

Mosquito Control Services

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

In the United States, mosquitoes are known to spread West Nile virus, eastern equine encephalitis and, in recent months, chikungunya virus. These illnesses do not have specific vaccines or treatments, so prevention of mosquito bites throughout the fall months is crucial.

  • Wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts and closed-toe shoes to protect the skin
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active
  • Eliminate areas of standing water around the home, such as flowerpots, birdbaths and baby pools. Mosquitoes only need about ½ inch of water to breed
  • Screen all windows and doors, repairing even the smallest holes that could serve as entry points for pests

CDC: WEST NILE CASES UP 25 PERCENT

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Foreclosures Can Make Mosquito Problem Worse

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Tennessean.com: Foreclosures Can Make Mosquito Problem Worse

Homes abandoned to foreclosures have given rise to an unexpected side effect that will only get worse this summer: stagnant swimming pools and overgrown yards transforming into mosquito breeding grounds.

This year, early-season heat and rain could combine with predictions of an uptick in foreclosures to create the “buggy summer” officials dread. Already, the weather likely has allowed for an additional generation of mosquitoes to take flight, said Metro Public Health Department managers.

Metro’s pest control division – a team of two – checks known breeding areas in the winter to kill as many mosquito larvae as possible. It’s the best way to keep the population down and decrease the threat of West Nile virus, and it allows staffers to be ready to respond to called-in resident complaints, which rise along with temperatures, said Larry Cole, pest management director.

Concerns about foreclosed homes put officials in a tricky situation. When calls come during the winter, officials try to track down property owners to ask that they be mindful of eliminating standing water. But it takes time to find owners.

And, as Cole says, “those mosquitoes are not going to wait.”

So if it’s already mosquito season, Metro acts as fast as possible, dropping larvicide bricks or grains into abandoned pools. “We’re going to larvicide because it’s a health issue,” Cole said.

On his rounds last week, pest control staffer John Pico responded to resident complaints across the eastern half of Davidson County. One of the pink slips of paper he held was a note about standing water in a pool on Jacksonian Drive in Hermitage.

At the tree-shaded white ranch-style home, Pico looked over the back gate, eyeing the pool, unsure whether it held water.

He knocked on the front door – no answer – and grabbed a pole from his truck. At its end hung a simple plastic cup to dip into the water to check for larvae. He slipped through the side gate, noting that he’d already whistled: “No dog came,” he said.

Around back, Pico eyed the pool, which was full of scuzzy green water. From the dilapidated red wooden deck, he spotted another concern: a fish pond.

The water there was a brighter green but hosted only a few mosquito larvae. Pico tossed in some larvicide and moved on to the next threat: a debris-covered hot tub. Before leaving, he’d also looked at water puddled on a camper trailer and inside a tire.

Vigilance needed

Mosquitoes typically lay eggs in stagnant water – any temporary puddle could work if it remains for a week or more. Larvae emerge from eggs into the water, where larvicide can kill them. The larvicides, generally nontoxic to human touch, are used under Environmental Protection Agency guidelines.

Veterans such as Pico and Cole say abandoned pools draw the most complaints from neighbors but don’t always house the most mosquitoes. Cole remembers repeat calls to Antioch for complaints about rampant mosquitoes near an abandoned home.

But the pool wasn’t the culprit.

“It was a little pie pan that was there in the sun,” Cole said. “You couldn’t even see the water because of all the larvae in there.”

In La Vergne and Murfreesboro, which have seen some of Middle Tennessee’s highest rates of foreclosure, officials typically begin their responses to nuisance property complaints by mailing maintenance notices to owners. As in Metro, officials try to avoid spending staff time and supplies on properties where they might not be repaid.

“We want to be good stewards of taxpayers’ money,” said Gary Whitaker, chief building official in Murfreesboro.

In recent years, Whitaker has been able to shift the duties of his staff away from permitting requests, which have decreased, and toward property maintenance complaints.

But officials can do only so much. In La Vergne, for example, a single codes enforcement officer handles a wide range of complaints. And longer mosquito breeding seasons can outlast the most potent larvicides, which last 90 days.

So officials depend on homeowners’ vigilance to eliminate standing water.

Pico said common-sense actions make a difference: flipping over dog bowls and other containers, pulling tarps taut and keeping pond water in motion.

Where there’s no one to tend to such things, neighbors should call to file complaints, Pico said. Experience has taught him that those are almost guaranteed, once it gets hot.

“It keeps you busy,” Pico said. “You’ve got job security.”

Foreclosures can make mosquito problem worse

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

Foreclosures can make mosquito problem worse

Homes abandoned to foreclosures have given rise to an unexpected side effect that will only get worse this summer: stagnant swimming pools and overgrown yards transforming into mosquito breeding grounds.

This year, early-season heat and rain could combine with predictions of an uptick in foreclosures to create the “buggy summer” officials dread. Already, the weather likely has allowed for an additional generation of mosquitoes to take flight, said Metro Public Health Department managers.

Metro’s pest control division – a team of two – checks known breeding areas in the winter to kill as many mosquito larvae as possible. It’s the best way to keep the population down and decrease the threat of West Nile virus, and it allows staffers to be ready to respond to called-in resident complaints, which rise along with temperatures, said Larry Cole, pest management director.

Concerns about foreclosed homes put officials in a tricky situation. When calls come during the winter, officials try to track down property owners to ask that they be mindful of eliminating standing water. But it takes time to find owners.

And, as Cole says, “those mosquitoes are not going to wait.”

So if it’s already mosquito season, Metro acts as fast as possible, dropping larvicide bricks or grains into abandoned pools. “We’re going to larvicide because it’s a health issue,” Cole said.

On his rounds last week, pest control staffer John Pico responded to resident complaints across the eastern half of Davidson County. One of the pink slips of paper he held was a note about standing water in a pool on Jacksonian Drive in Hermitage.

At the tree-shaded white ranch-style home, Pico looked over the back gate, eyeing the pool, unsure whether it held water.

He knocked on the front door – no answer – and grabbed a pole from his truck. At its end hung a simple plastic cup to dip into the water to check for larvae. He slipped through the side gate, noting that he’d already whistled: “No dog came,” he said.

Around back, Pico eyed the pool, which was full of scuzzy green water. From the dilapidated red wooden deck, he spotted another concern: a fish pond.

The water there was a brighter green but hosted only a few mosquito larvae. Pico tossed in some larvicide and moved on to the next threat: a debris-covered hot tub. Before leaving, he’d also looked at water puddled on a camper trailer and inside a tire.

Vigilance needed

Mosquitoes typically lay eggs in stagnant water – any temporary puddle could work if it remains for a week or more. Larvae emerge from eggs into the water, where larvicide can kill them. The larvicides, generally nontoxic to human touch, are used under Environmental Protection Agency guidelines.

Veterans such as Pico and Cole say abandoned pools draw the most complaints from neighbors but don’t always house the most mosquitoes. Cole remembers repeat calls to Antioch for complaints about rampant mosquitoes near an abandoned home.

But the pool wasn’t the culprit.

“It was a little pie pan that was there in the sun,” Cole said. “You couldn’t even see the water because of all the larvae in there.”

In La Vergne and Murfreesboro, which have seen some of Middle Tennessee’s highest rates of foreclosure, officials typically begin their responses to nuisance property complaints by mailing maintenance notices to owners. As in Metro, officials try to avoid spending staff time and supplies on properties where they might not be repaid.

“We want to be good stewards of taxpayers’ money,” said Gary Whitaker, chief building official in Murfreesboro.

In recent years, Whitaker has been able to shift the duties of his staff away from permitting requests, which have decreased, and toward property maintenance complaints.

But officials can do only so much. In La Vergne, for example, a single codes enforcement officer handles a wide range of complaints. And longer mosquito breeding seasons can outlast the most potent larvicides, which last 90 days.

So officials depend on homeowners’ vigilance to eliminate standing water.

Pico said common-sense actions make a difference: flipping over dog bowls and other containers, pulling tarps taut and keeping pond water in motion.

Where there’s no one to tend to such things, neighbors should call to file complaints, Pico said. Experience has taught him that those are almost guaranteed, once it gets hot.

“It keeps you busy,” Pico said. “You’ve got job security.”

Mosquitoes Have Spraying Companies Taking Different Approach

Monday, April 9th, 2012

WECT.com (Wilmington, NC): Mosquitoes Have Spraying Companies Taking Different Approach

WILMINGTON, NC – The streak of recent warm weather in the area has many in good moods – but it could become troublesome sooner rather than later.

The weather signals that it’s about that time for mosquitoes to start buzzing around the area, and a mild winter means more are on the way.

But now, there’s more paperwork involved when companies want to spray for mosquitoes. It’s not necessarily slowing down the spraying process, but it has some companies changing their approach.

Since spraying for mosquitoes is technically polluting, according to the EPA, companies like Cape Fear Mosquito Control are doing things a little differently.

“We target the areas around your house that your kids will be playing in, and nature is nature, and you can never kill all the bugs,” said Ben Phillips.

Some people worry about the spray because of their organic vegetable garden or bee hives. When local governments, like New Hanover County, spray, they send that mist into the air.

The spray used in those trucks is less than 1 fluid ounce per acre, according to David Jenkins with the county’s Vector Control Service. That includes less than 1 gram of permethrin, the active ingredient, per acre.

Even though the spray solution is registered with the EPA, and government Vector Control Services have earned the newly created National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit, some people still prefer to opt out of the service.

That could leave neighbors unprotected, which is where companies like Cape Fear Mosquito can use their direct approach.

“We never hit a flowering bush,” said Phillips. “We don’t want to endanger the butterflies or the honeybee population.”

Mosquito Control

AL.com: Mosquito Season in South Alabama One of the Worst Ever

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

AL.com: Mosquito Season in South Alabama One of the Worst Ever

MOBILE, AL – Blame it on the rain, and the mild winter weather and the high tides. Those key elements have converged this winter and spring, health officials said, to create the best possible scenario for the pesky mosquito to prosper in coastal Alabama.

“It’s been a perfect year for mosquito breeding,” said Jerry Folse, director of the Division of Vector Control for the Mobile County Health Department. “It’s one of the worst ones I’ve ever seen.”

Folse, who lives close to the coast in southern Mobile County, said annual night sprays should begin in the next few weeks, as the health department works to control the mosquito population across a 12,000-square-mile area.

While mosquitoes that hatch out in urban areas can carry diseases, the ones bred in salt marshes are known to be more aggressive, Folse said, and hatch out in large numbers all at once.

“Hopefully,” he said, “We’re going to get a handle on them fairly quickly.”

Here are  some tips to keep in mind while going outdoors when mosquitoes are out in force, typically at dusk and dawn.

Other precautions residents can take to reduce mosquito annoyance include:

– Use a good mosquito repellant on arms, legs, and other exposed areas (some of the most reliable repellants contain the chemical DEET; repellants with high concentrations of DEET – over 10%, should not be used on children).

– Follow instructions carefully when using any insect repellent.

– Long sleeves and long pants used with a mosquito repellent helps to limit bites.

– Wear light-colored clothing (dark-colored clothing may help attract unwanted insects).

– Wear a hat or a cap (preferably light-colored).

– Be aware that aromatic (scented) cosmetics may also attract insects.

Mosquito bites can be treated with topical agents such as calamine and menthol lotions. Cortisone creams and oral antihistamines are available as over-the-counter medications that can reduce itching. Bites to children should be watched for secondary infections that might need to be treated by a physician.

Mosquito Control Services

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Mosquito Control Services ~ SCAN QR CODE TO PROCEED.