Archive for the ‘Atlanta Bed Bug Control’ Category

Where Are Bed bugs Hiding? | Atlanta Bed Bug Control

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

We have all heard horror stories about people acquiring bedbugs in hotels while on vacation. Although it is certainly common to find bedbugs in hotel rooms, there may be a plethora of other bedbug hotspots that you are not aware of, and you should be if you want to keep bedbugs away from you and your things.

Public libraries are often a breeding ground for bedbugs, and it is not uncommon to find bedbugs inside of books. If you do check out any items from the library, you should check each one for bedbugs because they are versatile enough to live for on hard surfaces.

Retail shops count as another public location where bedbug infestations are common. For example, during the summer of 2010 numerous retail stores were closed around Manhattan when bedbugs were found to be hiding in several products available to purchase. So if you are a big shopper, you may not want to check every little thing you buy for bedbugs, but if you live in a bigger city it would be foolish not to.

Have you ever purchased a product from a store to later discover that it was infested with bedbugs?

How to Prevent Hitchhiking Bed Bugs | Atlanta Bed Bug Control

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

Atlanta Bed Bug Removal

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

Atlanta Bed bug control

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

Bed bug control

3 Keys to a Successful Heat Treatment:

  1. Bring Heat. Electric bed bug heaters are placed within the space; introducing and recirculating heated air with a target temperature not to exceed 135°F.
  2. Monitor. Temperatures are monitored in real time from a remote location using wireless sensors to ensure lethal temperatures are reached without damaging the space and its contents.
  3. Move Air. High temperature fans move heated air throughout the space to reach insects in cracks and crevices or high infestation zones.

Expert Advice For a Bed Bug-Free School Year

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Expert Advice For a Bed Bug-Free School Year

Bug Busters USA shares back-to-school tips to prevent a bed bug infestation 

AtlantaBedbugControl

Summer vacation is almost over and before we know it schools and universities will be back in session. While shopping for school supplies and a new wardrobe might take precedence over the next few weeks, Bug Busters USA, a pest management company servicing the Southeast encourages parents and students to also spend some time brushing up on bed bug prevention tips.

“Bed bugs are excellent hitchhikers and thrive in heavily populated places,” said Court Parker, COO for Bug Busters USA . “This makes classrooms and dorms the perfect settings for bed bugs to take up residence. ”

A study conducted by the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) and the University of Kentucky found that bed bug infestations are on the rise in many different types of dwellings, including school and college settings. According to the survey, 47 percent of respondents had treated for bed bugs in college dorms in 2013, while 41 percent had reported bed bug infestations in schools and daycare centers.

NPMA experts recommend the following tips for students in grades K-12 to avoid bringing bed bugs home:

  • Parents should regularly inspect their children’s belongings for hitchhiking bed bugs
  • If the school has reported an infestation, consider housing all related items in a sealed plastic bin
  • Wash and dry cloth items returning from school in hot temperatures
  • Ask school administrators whether they have bed bug detection and elimination plans

NPMA also advises college students to take steps to protect against bed bugs, including:

  • Fully inspect suitcases prior to re-packing for a return to school, especially after any summer trips
  • Before putting sheets on the dormitory bed, inspect the mattress seams, particularly at the corners, and box springs for telltale stains or spots
  • Thoroughly inspect the entire room before unpacking, including behind the headboard and in sofas and chairs
  • Inspect any “secondhand” furniture for bed bugs before bringing it into dormitory rooms or off-campus housing

For more information on bed bugs, please visit www.bugbustersusa.com

Atlanta Bed Bug Control

Friday, March 28th, 2014

Steps that you and your family can take to help prevent a bed bug infestation

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

Why are bedbugs an issue for hotels, visitors, and homeowners?

Bedbugs leave itchy, bloody welts on human skin.  Adult bedbugs can live for a year without eating, making them especially hard to control.  Once inside a hotel or home, bedbugs spread rapidly from room to room – through pipes, in vacuum cleaners, on clothing and luggage.  In a hotel, bedbugs can even spread to neighboring rooms, since guests are may end up moving to another room.

Steps that you and your family can take to help prevent a bed bug infestation:

To prevent bedbug infestations, consumers need to be vigilant in assessing their surroundings. When returning from a trip, check your luggage and clothing.  If you think you may have a bedbug infestation, contact a pest control professional.  This is not a pest that can be controlled with do-it-yourself measures.

  • Vacuum suitcases after returning from a vacation.
  • Check your sheets for tell-tale blood spots.
  • Consider bringing a large plastic trashbag to keep your suitcase in during hotel stays.
  • Carry a small flashlight to assist you with quick visual inspections.
  • Never bring second-hand furniture, especially mattresses and box springs, into a home without thoroughly examining for signs of a bed bug infestation. You might consider having a pest control professional inspect the furniture as it is difficult to detect an infestation without training.
  • Regularly inspect areas where pets sleep for signs of bed bugs.
  • Bed bugs are elusive creatures, so it is imperative to seek professional pest control assistance to address an infestation.

Bed Bug prevention tips for travelers in 2014

Monday, December 30th, 2013

Bed Bug prevention tips for travelers in 2014:

  • At hotels, thoroughly inspect the entire room before unpacking, including behind the headboard and in furniture. Pull back the bed sheets and check the mattress seams and box springs for pepper-like stains that may be evidence of bed bug activity.
  • If you suspect an infestation or problem, notify management and change rooms immediately. Be sure the new room is not adjacent to or directly below or above the possibly infested room.
  • Keep suitcases in plastic trash bags or protective covers during a hotel stay to prevent bed bugs from nesting there. Do not put them on the beds.
  • Upon returning home from a trip, inspect all suitcases and other belongings before bringing them into the house.
  • Wash all clothes – even those that have not been worn – in hot water and dry them using an extra-hot dryer setting

For more information on bed bugs, please visit http://www.bugbustersusa.com/commercial_services/bed-bugs.asp

Become a Facebook Fan of Kinsey- The Bed Bug Sniffing Dog

Monday, December 9th, 2013

Due to the popularity of Kinsey, our bed bug sniffing dog….We setup a Facebook page that you can become a Fan of.

The URL is https://www.facebook.com/KinseyBedBugDog  Make sure you click through and become a Fan!

Invasive Pests

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Experts at the National Pest Management Association (NPMA), a nonprofit organization committed to the protection of public health, food and property from household pests, encourage homeowners to also be on the lookout for the following invasive species:

Red Imported Fire Ant (RIFA) – RIFAs were brought to the United States in 1930 from South America and are mainly found in the southern region of the country. When disturbed, they are known to swarm and sting humans, often causing painful welts on the skin.

Asian Tiger Mosquito – Originating from Southeast Asia, the Asian tiger mosquito is now found throughout the eastern, Midwestern and southern states. This mosquito species can cause an irritable bite and spread several diseases, including Dengue fever, West Nile virus and Japanese Encephalitis.

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug – Likely introduced from Eastern Asia, stink bugs are most prevalent in the northeast. While stink bugs don’t pose any health threats, they can produce an unpleasant odor when crushed.

Formosan Termite – Originally from China, Formosan termites are the most aggressive subterranean termite species. They are capable of consuming wood at rapid speeds, posing a serious structural threat to a property if left untreated.

Due to the health and property risks posed by invasive species, homeowners should frequently inspect the home for signs of an infestation and contact a licensed pest professional to treat any potential pest problems.

For more information on invasive pests, please visit www.bugbustersusa.com