All About ANT-MAN (Everything You Need To Know)!

September 16th, 2014

Avoid Tick Encounters with These Simple Tips

September 15th, 2014

Ways to prevent a tick encounter include:

  • Landscape your yard. Keep grass cut low and remove weeds, woodpiles and debris. Ticks are found in high grass, and yards with shrubbery.
  • Protect your skin. Wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts and closed-toe shoes when outdoors, especially in wooded areas or tall grasses. Choose light colored clothing that makes it easier to spot ticks and other insects.
  • Use an effective bug repellant. Always apply an insect repellant containing at least 20% DEET to protect against ticks when spending time outdoors, and reapply as directed on the label.
  • Regularly check for ticks. Most ticks require 24-48 hours of feeding before they can successfully transmit infections, so it’s crucial to perform a thorough tick check immediately after spending time outdoors. Be sure to check all areas of the body, including the hair.
  • Don’t forget about pets. Check pets frequently for ticks, especially after the animal has been outside. Consult with a veterinarian about prevention and treatment options available to pets and wash pet bedding and toys frequently.
  • Brush up on proper removal techniques. Use fine-tipped tweezers to remove a tick, using a slow, steady pulling motion. Wash hands and the bite site thoroughly with soap and water, and flush the tick down a toilet or wrap it in tissue before disposing in a closed receptacle.
  • Contact a professional. Anyone suspecting a tick bite or experiencing symptoms, including a skin rash, joint pain or fever, should seek prompt medical attention. If ticks are a problem on your property, contact a licensed pest professional to inspect and implement a treatment plan to reduce tick populations.

Hadyn Parry: Re-engineering mosquitos to fight disease

September 12th, 2014

We will Never Forget

September 11th, 2014

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Beating the Bed Bug

September 10th, 2014

Beating the Bed Bug

Bed bugs come in numbers and are hard to kill. OTC foggers have proven to be ineffective when dealing with them, and in some cases, it has taken extreme measures to eliminate an infestation. Some homeowners have even resorted to trying to kill the pests with carbon monoxide, but unless you’re planning to crank up your gas stove, blow out the pilot light and risk an explosion, that’s probably not your best option.

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Here are some safer ways to battle the bug:

  • Find out where the little terrorists are so you can eliminate all of them at once. Bed bugs are notoriously hard to detect; they often carry a scent similar to rotting fruit, and may leave behind small, dark spots on your sheets and mattress. Bed bugs can also lodge in couch cushions and other soft surfaces, so be on the lookout in your entire home.
  • Try vacuuming the bugs into a bag and throwing them away.
  • Close your windows, shut the blinds and crank the temperature up past 113 degrees to kill off the bug.
  • Use pyrethroid-based poisons to effectively eliminate them.
  • Hire a professional to debug your pad.

Bed bugs are just like any other bug; which means that no matter how difficult it is to exterminate them, they can be killed. A professional exterminator can locate and deal with the problem so you never have to sleep with these minuscule hitchhikers again. If you suspect that there are bed bugs in your home, dispatch the little buggers right away.

What can a consumer do to protect themselves from bedbug infestations?

September 9th, 2014
What can a consumer do to protect themselves from bedbug infestations?

To prevent bedbug infestations, consumers need to be vigilant in assessing their surroundings. When returning from a trip, check your luggage and clothing. If you think you may have a bed bug infestation, contact a pest control professional. This is not a pest that can be controlled with do-it-yourself measures.

Here are some steps that you and your family can take to help prevent a bed bug infestation:

  • When possible replace wooden headboards and bed frames with metal ones. Although bed bugs can still hide and nest in metal, they are less likely to than wood.
  • Keep the bed bug protective covers provided by Bug Busters USA on your mattress and box spring. New mattresses and box springs should immediately be covered as well.
  • Always carefully inspect antiques and any second-hand furniture before bringing them into your home, even if they aren’t upholstered.
  • Always wash and dry on high heat any second hand clothing or, when possible toys or other items before bringing them into your home.
  • When travelling, inspect the mattress and box spring you will be sleeping on. In addition to looking for the actual bed bugs, look for small brownish or reddish dots on the bed linens and mattresses. This is why most hotels use white sheets, if the hotels sheets are dark in color, this could be a red flag.
  • When travelling, do not put your luggage on the bed, this gives bed bugs a ride right into your. Use the metal luggage rack, which should also be kept away from not only the bed, but also the curtains, tables and wall hangings in the rooms. Don’t forget to inspect your luggage when you return from trips before you bring them back into your home.
  • Have overnight guests to your home check/inspect their bags and luggage as well before placing them in their sleeping quarters.
  • Vacuum at least once a week, pay special attention to areas around beds and furniture posts.
  • Prevent bed bug harborage (hiding places) by keeping all areas free of excessive storage and clutter.

Tick Prevention Tips From Bug Busters USA

September 8th, 2014
  • Landscape your yard. Keep grass cut low and remove weeds, woodpiles and debris. Ticks are found in high grass, and yards with shrubbery.
  • Protect your skin. Wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts and closed-toe shoes when outdoors, especially in wooded areas or tall grasses. Choose light colored clothing that makes it easier to spot ticks and other insects.
  • Use an effective bug repellant. Always apply an insect repellant containing at least 20% DEET to protect against ticks when spending time outdoors, and reapply as directed on the label.
  • Regularly check for ticks. Most ticks require 24-48 hours of feeding before they can successfully transmit infections, so it’s crucial to perform a thorough tick check immediately after spending time outdoors. Be sure to check all areas of the body, including the hair.
  • Don’t forget about pets. Check pets frequently for ticks, especially after the animal has been outside. Consult with a veterinarian about prevention and treatment options available to pets and wash pet bedding and toys frequently.
  • Brush up on proper removal techniques. Use fine-tipped tweezers to remove a tick, using a slow, steady pulling motion. Wash hands and the bite site thoroughly with soap and water, and flush the tick down a toilet or wrap it in tissue before disposing in a closed receptacle.
  • Contact a professional. Anyone suspecting a tick bite or experiencing symptoms, including a skin rash, joint pain or fever, should seek prompt medical attention. If ticks are a problem on your property, contact a licensed pest professional to inspect and implement a treatment plan to reduce tick populations.

Mutant Giant Spider Dog

September 5th, 2014

Mosquito Control Experts

September 4th, 2014

Mosquitoes are known to transmit many potentially fatal diseases to both humans and mammals, such as horses.  Some of the most common and well-known diseases include West Nile Virus, malaria, dengue fever and equine encephalitis (EEE). In Africa, more than 700,000 children die each year from malaria.

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West Nile virus is a common concern among Americans – and rightfully so. West Nile virus has continued to spread across the country since the first reported incidence in 1999. The worst year for the mosquito-borne disease was 2002, which saw nearly 3,000 severe cases and 284 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, experts are predicting that the outbreak in 2012 might become the deadliest ever. As of September 18, there have been 3,142 cases and 134 deaths reported to the CDC this year. Texas has remained the epicenter, accounting for forty percent of the nation’s West Nile virus cases.

Mosquitoes are considered one of summer’s most dangerous pests, but they also thrive in the fall. In fact, mosquitoes will remain active until temperatures drop below 60 degrees, so people are currently still at an increased risk of contracting West Nile virus.

There is no solid evidence as to why 2012 has been such a bad year for West Nile virus, but experts speculate that the extreme heat and drought conditions experienced across the country are a factor. All insects are cold-blooded, which means that their body temperatures are regulated by outside temperatures. When the weather gets hotter, larva grow at a faster pace, breeding cycle speeds up and pests including mosquitoes become more active.

Dr. Jorge Parada, medical spokesperson for the NPMA, says that in most cases, symptoms of West Nile virus are so slight they go by unnoticed or feel like summer flu. However, in extreme cases, it can be a potentially life-threatening infection with a high fever, head and body aches, worsening weakness, confusion and even coma.

If you start experiencing symptoms of West Nile virus, it’s important to seek immediate medical attention.

 

How can I prevent West Nile virus?

There are a number of precautions that people can take to protect their home and family from mosquitoes and minimize the potential of contracting West Nile virus. The NPMA recommends the following tips:

  • Eliminate or reduce mosquito-breeding sites around the home by replacing all standing water at least once a week. This includes birdbaths, flowerpots, grill covers, baby pools and other objects where water collects. Mosquitoes on need about ½ inch of water to breed.
  • Screen windows, doors, and other openings with mesh. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.
    • Use mesh that is 18X18 strands per inch, or finer.
    • Seal around all screen edges; and keep doors and windows shut to prevent entry of most mosquito species.
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
  • When outdoors, wear long-sleeved shirts and long-legged pants.
  • Use an insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin or oil of lemon-eucalyptus on exposed skin whenever outdoors. Check product labels for information on age restrictions to make sure they are safe for your toddler or infant.

If you are concerned about mosquito activity on your property, consider contacting a pest management company. They can help reduce exposure to mosquitoes and decrease the risks for mosquito-borne illnesses by inspecting properties for mosquito breeding sites and treating to control mosquitoes. In addition, they can suggest corrective actions, and provide basic information, current news and references to other sources.

You can also contact your municipality or township to see if your community has a mosquito management program in place. Only a concerted community-wide effort can properly manage these pests and reduce the risks associated with them.

What is the forecast for mosquito-borne illnesses in the future?

Unfortunately, we do not have a crystal ball to predict future outbreaks of pest-related illnesses. But, what we do know is that mosquitoes have been on this planet for millions of years and they will continue to thrive during the warmer months.

Bug Busters USA | Tips to Keep Sting Bugs Out

September 3rd, 2014

Bug Busters USA recommends the following prevention tips to minimize the chance of a stink bug invasion:

  • Seal cracks around windows, doors, electrical outlets, ceiling fans and light switches to prevent stink bugs from entering the home.
  • Replace outdoor lighting with yellow bulbs, which are less attractive to stink bugs.
  • Repair damaged window screens and install door sweeps on exterior doors.
  • Install screens over the chimney and attic vents.
  • Properly ventilate basements, attics, garages and crawl spaces. Consider using a dehumidifier.
  • If stink bugs have already entered a home, use a vacuum cleaner to remove them. Dispose of the vacuum bag immediately to prevent odor from permeating the area.